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Neighbours at war

A group of Carterton residents are unhappy about the impact of a quarry on their neighbourhood, but the quarry owner says he is following all the rules.

Locals say the quarry in Parkers Rd is noisy, with dust and vibration levels disturbing their quiet enjoyment of their properties. They acknowledged recent noise levels had abated following the contractor taking action after their complaints.

Kieran Oliver owns Kieran Oliver Quarries Ltd, which owns and operates the site.

He accepted recent isolated incidents had impacted residents, but said the issue had been addressed.

“We do take resident’s complaints very seriously.

“On only two occasions, a junior staff member had not directly followed instructions. Appropriate action was taken immediately, including letting the council know.”

A resident informally estimated that up to 40 homes in the area, including Chester Rd, Norfolk Rd, Parkers Rd, and Wiltons Rd, were affected by around 60 truck journeys a day to and from the facility.

Residents last week held a meeting to discuss the issue at the West Taratahi community hall.

Penny Deys lives in one of about five residential properties estimated to be within 200 metres of the operation.

She described recently hearing motors revving at about 6.50 am one morning when work was not supposed to start before 7.30am. She acknowledged the efforts Oliver had made to deal with noise after speaking to residents.

“The trucks are no longer engine braking and revving their engines. They no longer speed along our road, and the noise is almost bearable,” she said.

“We are grateful for that, but we still have a long way to go with dust, traffic, and vibrations in houses.”

A resident at the meeting had described vibrations from machinery.

“Our house shakes, and even the lamps move,” she said.

“I can feel it inside the house. The dogs go nuts.”

A third described vehicle noise, which had since abated.

“Some trucks use the engine brakes all the time. In the morning, the noise is hideous.”

A couple said their home was now full of dust.

“The dust gets me,” one said.

“You can’t sit outside because everything is covered in dust. You can’t do your washing. You can’t have your doors or windows open.”

Oliver said all the rules and processes were being followed, and he had obtained proper consent.

“We have done everything by the book,” he said.

“We are just trying to run a business. We do support a lot of local builders and other businesses with the aggregate we produce.”

Greater Wellington Regional Council [GWRC] director strategy, policy and regulation Fathima Iftikar said for the consenting of quarries, district and regional councils had jurisdiction over different areas.

“For the Parkers Rd quarry, Greater Wellington is responsible for regulating the effects on the natural environment, including surface and groundwater, and air quality. “

She said Carterton District Council [CDC] administered rules on things like land use, traffic movements, safety, vibration, and road maintenance.

Iftikar said the proposal to undertake quarrying at 75 Parkers Road had triggered an application for resource consent from GWRC, which had been granted. The consent only related to earthworks.

She said GWRC understood the district’s plan, administered by CDC, allowed quarrying and gravel extraction.

“We are aware of concerns raised by neighbours in relation to the quarry, but CDC has jurisdiction over matters such as traffic, noise, and roading-related effects.”

A CDC spokesperson said the council had received a service request about the noise levels on Parkers Rd.

“The activity thought to be the cause of the noise is permitted under the operative and draft district plans,” they said.

“Council has proactively worked with the operators over noise levels and times of operation. We have been monitoring the site for noise at least weekly and are considering raising the frequency of these checks to assure compliance with the noise levels as set out in the District Plan.”

The spokesperson said each time the noise levels were checked, they had been found to be under the levels prescribed by the plan.

“However, as previously stated, the activity itself is permitted, and as such council has no ability to impose mitigation measures.”

They said CDC had also issued a consent to store an excavator on-site overnight. This meant the machine did not need to be transported to and from the site daily. “The trucks are no longer engine braking and revving their engines. They no longer speed along our road, and the noise is almost bearable,” she said.

“We are grateful for that, but we still have a long way to go with dust, traffic, and vibrations in houses.”

A resident at the meeting had described vibrations from machinery.

“Our house shakes, and even the lamps move,” she said.

“I can feel it inside the house. The dogs go nuts.”

A third described vehicle noise, which had since abated.

“Some trucks use the engine brakes all the time. In the morning, the noise is hideous.”

A couple said their home was now full of dust.

“The dust gets me,” one said.

“You can’t sit outside because everything is covered in dust. You can’t do your washing. You can’t have your doors or windows open.”

Oliver said all the rules and processes were being followed, and he had obtained proper consent.

“We have done everything by the book,” he said.

“We are just trying to run a business. We do support a lot of local builders and other businesses with the aggregate we produce.”

Greater Wellington Regional Council [GWRC] director strategy, policy and regulation Fathima Iftikar said for the consenting of quarries, district and regional councils had jurisdiction over different areas.

“For the Parkers Rd quarry, Greater Wellington is responsible for regulating the effects on the natural environment, including surface and groundwater, and air quality. “

She said Carterton District Council [CDC] administered rules on things like land use, traffic movements, safety, vibration, and road maintenance.

Iftikar said the proposal to undertake quarrying at 75 Parkers Road had triggered an application for resource consent from GWRC, which had been granted. The consent only related to earthworks.

She said GWRC understood the district’s plan, administered by CDC, allowed quarrying and gravel extraction.

“We are aware of concerns raised by neighbours in relation to the quarry, but CDC has jurisdiction over matters such as traffic, noise, and roading-related effects.”

A CDC spokesperson said the council had received a service request about the noise levels on Parkers Rd.

“The activity thought to be the cause of the noise is permitted under the operative and draft district plans,” they said.

“Council has proactively worked with the operators over noise levels and times of operation. We have been monitoring the site for noise at least weekly and are considering raising the frequency of these checks to assure compliance with the noise levels as set out in the District Plan.”

The spokesperson said each time the noise levels were checked, they had been found to be under the levels prescribed by the plan.

“However, as previously stated, the activity itself is permitted, and as such council has no ability to impose mitigation measures.”

They said CDC had also issued a consent to store an excavator on-site overnight. This meant the machine did not need to be transported to and from the site daily.

1 COMMENT

  1. It’s a sorry state when you move to the rural area for PEACE AND QUIET 🤫 AND THIS HAPPENS. Don’t count on the council for help they are only interested in money. Parkers road is not fit for purpose know they have changed vehicle usage for cars to large truck and trailers.

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