Military medal and life-saving heroics

Masterton’s Harry Selby, second from right in the front row, died on October 5, 1917,...

Crush injury “worse than being shot”

George Scrimgeour was born in Waipawa and later came to Masterton with his father, who...

Grandad puts a stop to divorce talk

Ethel Barr as a young girl. She was born in Masterton in 1894. PHOTO/WAIRARAPA ARCHIVE...
Military medal and life-saving heroics

Military medal and life-saving heroics

Masterton’s Harry Selby, second from right in the front row, died on October 5, 1917, while serving as a gunner on the Western Front. PHOTO/WAIRARAPA ARCHIVE Among the first Masterton soldiers to enlist for World War I was the popular athlete Harry Selby. He was born...

Crush injury “worse than being shot”

Crush injury “worse than being shot”

George Scrimgeour was born in Waipawa and later came to Masterton with his father, who was a hotelkeeper and had taken up the licence of the Club Hotel. Scrimgeour became very sick with pneumonia in 1912 and was hospitalised for a period of time before he made a...

Grandad puts a stop to divorce talk

Grandad puts a stop to divorce talk

Ethel Barr as a young girl. She was born in Masterton in 1894. PHOTO/WAIRARAPA ARCHIVE Ethel Barr was born in Masterton in 1894, the illegitimate daughter of Alice Braggins, thus granddaughter of Edward Braggins, an early Masterton publican, and his wife Sarah Sayers....

Mum stops raid on German neighbours

Mum stops raid on German neighbours

Greytown historian Jack Bull in a Times-Age photo published in July, 1990. He had a keen interest in the natural and cultural history of his town. PHOTO/WAIRARAPA ARCHIVE Jack Bull was one of Wairarapa’s prominent historians. Born in 1910, he was too young to enlist...

‘We have lost a good many men’

‘We have lost a good many men’

People climbing Mt Maunsell, known locally as the Tinui Taipo, to the Tinui Anzac Cross. PHOTO/FILE One of Masterton’s first soldiers was a carpenter who served at Gallipoli, but was back in New Zealand by the first Anzac Day in 1916. There he took part in raising the...

The Masterton draper kept from the war

The Masterton draper kept from the war

Archie Dixon was the son of Charles Dixon and his wife Alice Herbert. He attended Masterton School [later Central School] where he was a keen sportsman and represented Wairarapa in national hockey tournaments. After leaving school, he was employed at the drapery shop...

The soldier left for dead

The soldier left for dead

Ernie Arcus, left, riding a camel in Egypt. PHOTOS/WAIRARAPA ARCHIVE William Ernest Arcus William Ernest “Ernie” Arcus was born in late 1893, the son of carpenter Thomas Arcus and his wife Elizabeth Shaw of Carterton. He was among the first Wairarapa soldiers to...

Remembering our people through their stories

Remembering our people through their stories

Gareth Winter and Mark Pacey of the Wairarapa Archive The story of New Zealand’s involvement in World War I is many faceted. There are many stories of the soldiers who served overseas – more than 100,000 men – and of the horrific casualty rate – about 18,000 soldiers...