Masterton Mayor Lyn Patterson, right, has thanked chief executive Pim Borren for his four years of service. PHOTO/FILE

CAL ROBERTS and SEAMUS BOYER
cal.roberts@age.co.nz
Masterton councillors have decided their council boss is not part of the district’s long-term plans.
Pim Borren, who has been the chief executive for four years, was interviewed for the role by mayor Lyn Patterson and Masterton’s 10 district councillors at the end of March, but not offered the job.
He told Masterton District Council staff on Tuesday that he would be leaving the role at the end of June.
It is understood four people have been interviewed for the role, but as yet no successor had been announced.
Mr Borren initially signed on for two years in 2014, and had seen that fixed-term contract extended to June 30 this year.
The term of the contract was shorter than usual due to potential consequences of the ongoing amalgamation process in the region.
Legally, all councils must advertise their chief executive position regularly.
On Tuesday Mrs Patterson said the council had decided not to renew Mr Borren’s contract, but did not give reasons, saying the recruitment process was ongoing.
“Council thanks Pim for his four years of service and commitment.”
Mr Borren said he did not know why he had not been offered the role, but was proud of what he had achieved.
“I’m disappointed that I didn’t win the job, but I also feel very strongly that I’m going out on a high, both from an organisational point of view and also from a community point of view.
He said an internal survey had shown high levels of staff satisfaction.
The main role of a council chief executive was to work for the community, and in an economic as well as well-being perspective he felt he had achieved that.
He said the My Masterton campaign was an example of one of his successes.
That campaign, which advertised the district to Auckland and Wellington, had changed the perception of Masterton to those outside the region, and contributed to the crowning of Masterton as New Zealand’s most beautiful city last year.
As well as being MDC chief executive, he is also vice-president of the New Zealand Society of Local Government Managers, a group made up of more than 600 local government professionals.
Mr Borren said he would be considering his options post-MDC, but a return to a role in education or economics was possible.
“It’s been an honour and a privilege to lead Masterton District Council as the CEO, and I want to thank staff for their fantastic support and that of the elected members.”
Mrs Patterson said the council was in the middle of a “robust recruitment process” and said MDC would make a further announcement by April 23.
MDC is in the middle of its consultation period for the Long-Term Plan, which details the district’s strategy and objectives for the next 10 years.
Consultation closes on April 30.