The opening of the new all-weather green at the Carrington Bowling Club. [from left to right]. Tom Hullena [Eastern and Central Trust], Mike Lander [Carrington], Rex Kenny [Carrington president], Jane Davis [Carterton DC CEO], Greg Lang [Carterton mayor], Jillayne McGregor [sponsor], Warren Wyeth [Bowls Wairarapa]. PHOTO/JADE CVETKOV

Chris Cogdale

The Carrington Bowling and Croquet Club’s new artificial bowling green is already paying off for the club.

The installation of the Tiger Turf carpet weave all-weather green was completed in early August, after a six-week delay because of the covid-19 level four lockdown.

The green in Carrington Park was officially opened by Carterton Mayor Greg Lang earlier this month.

Immediate past-president Ray Beale said it’s a culmination of seven years hard work and the benefits have been evident already.

“A normal grass green is only good for about eight to 10 months of the year, but this is good for 12 months, as we’ve proved,” he said.

“We’re normally not playing bowls in August or September and we’ve been playing since early August. The day after it was down, we were out bowling.”

“Also, our membership has gone from about 70 to 90 already and I think we will probably almost double our membership.”

The ceremonial first bowl, which was to be bowled by Lang, was cancelled because of cold, wet weather, steady rain, and a hailstorm just before its opening.

The advantage of the new green was evident with the surface water draining quickly, which on a competition day would allow bowling to resume promptly, whereas a traditional grass green would result in long delays in play.

“When you see the amount of rain and hail that we had there, and there’s none lying on the surface, it shows you how good it is. It has got drainage underneath it which goes to the far corner; it’s amazing how quickly it does drain away.”

Long term, Beale saidd the wider community would also use the new facility.

“What we want to do is create a school programme through the colleges and see if we can get some sort of competition going and get the kids involved that way.

“Bowls nowadays has got to the stage that people don’t want to spend a whole day playing, much like other sports, and this new format of bowls you can come along and get it over and done with, in an hour.”

The carpet weave green has an expected lifespan of about 10 years, although Beale said if it’s well looked after the club could get 12 years use out of it.



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