BY EMILY NORMAN

In a modest workshop in Central Otago, Kobi Bosshard continues to live up to his reputation as the “grandfather of contemporary New Zealand jewellery”.

Approaching 80 years old, the Swiss goldsmith, is the subject of the Kiwi documentary, Kobi, which will screen at Masterton’s Regent 3 Cinemas in conjunction with the International Film Festival.

But, this screening on September 11 in Masterton is particularly special, as audiences will have the opportunity to engage directly with the filmmaker Andrea Bosshard – Kobi’s daughter.

Bosshard’s lucid and loving film portrait of her father has been described as “one of the year’s loveliest films” by the New Zealand International Film Festival organisers – “a lyrical evocation of rich, unhurried life”.

The film incorporates archival footage and readings of family letters, bringing audiences into the heart of Kobi’s life.

This unique opportunity to meet with the film’s director is facilitated by Film Talks Wairarapa.

Supported by the Masterton Arts Fund, Film Talks Wairarapa was the brainchild of Wairarapa born and raised film enthusiast Jane Ross.

Ross, who has a Master of Arts in Film and Media Studies has a wealth of experience in the film industry as a film advisor, critic, and advocate.

After living in England, the Czech Republic and Italy, she returned to Wairarapa with the idea of creating “more opportunities for artistic engagement with the Wairarapa community”.

She said she was “thrilled” to partner with the Film Festival and Regent 3 Cinemas to establish the film talks.

Her long-term goal is to increase participation in local festival events, provide networking opportunities for Wairarapa people, and promote the region’s “film-friendliness”.

“Masterton has always been a film-friendly town, with a strong cinematic following that dates back to the 1930s,” she said.

“The vision I have is to encourage and attract international filmmakers, and also support the local film industry and make that grow.”

Regent 3 Cinemas owner Brent Goodwin said the film talks would add an extra facet to the festival locally and would be a great learning opportunity for budding filmmakers in Wairarapa.

He estimated it was the 25th year the cinema had been involved with the Film Festival.

“We’re one of the smaller places in New Zealand that are fortunate enough to host the festival.

“I just regard it as a privilege.”

Kobi will be screened at 6pm on September 11.